Pablo Picasso. The Three Dancers, 1925

The Three Dancers

Les Trois danseurs

1925

Oil on canvas

London, Tate Gallery

Surrealism  

This picture is the artist’s first Surrealistic work, in which he "proves harmony by algebra" by breaking the human body into pieces and re-assembling it using absolutely unique patterns born in his head. Some believed that the discord in the relationship with his wife, the former ballerina Olga Khokhlova, was the reason why he depicted the dancers as convulsive puppets. Only in 1965, the artist explained that the painting filled with broken figures should have really been called "The Dance of Death", as it was inspired by memories of the death of two of his fellow artists: Carlos Casagemas in 1901 and Ramon Pichot in 1925 (both involved in a love triangle with a femme fatale Germaine Gargallo). Carlos Casagemas accompanied Picasso during his first visit to Paris. Overwhelmed by passion for Germain, he shot her and then committed a suicide. In the first case, the bullet missed, and after a while the lady became the wife of Ramon Pichot. While working on "The Three Dancers", Picasso received the news of Pichot’s death.


More from 1925

Pablo Picasso. Mandolin, fruit basket and plaster arm, 1925
Mandolin, fruit basket and plaster arm, 1925
Pablo Picasso. The bottle of wine, 1925
The bottle of wine, 1925
Pablo Picasso. Mandolin, fruit bowl, marble arms, 1925
Mandolin, fruit bowl, marble arms, 1925
Pablo Picasso. The Three Graces, 1925
The Three Graces, 1925
Pablo Picasso. Still life, 1925
Still life, 1925

All artworks by year


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